Hello Uncle Foreigner

Aug 27, 2014

A jaunt through Songpan and Jiuzhaigou

Getting out of the city

Fishies in a pond at Jiuzhaigou
Little fishies in a pool at Jiuzhaigou nature reserve
A Songpan side street
A side-street in the ancient city at Songpan

Our kids are constantly telling us that they prefer the countryside to the city, and now that Peter and I have gotten out and about a little, we’re starting to see their point. Yeah, you can sometimes find a taco or a rock band, but we’ve found that there’s a certain concrete sameyness to Chinese cities. Duh, says everyone else: “The city is for working,” a new friend told us, but this is home.

The “this” she was referring to was the Jiuzhaigou nature reserve, in mountainous northern Sichuan Province. It’s a spectacular park where they have these startlingly colorful lakes of deep blues and greens, nestled into a series of striking valleys. You may have seen pictures; Jiuzhaigou shows up all the time on internet travel lists and email forwards containing, like, “15 Places That’ll Blow Your Face Off,” or whatever. It really is incredible looking and people have been telling us to go there pretty much since we’ve arrived in China.

So this summer, finally, we decided to go north and check it out. (It didn’t hurt that the climate up there was a good 10° C cooler than the summertime furnace of south Sichuan.) We prefixed the trip with a few days in the neighboring area of Songpan, a sleepy little ancient town that serves as a base for horse trekking and other outdoorsy pursuits. This place is not so famous: It gets a small mention in all the western guidebooks, as a place that is near Jiuzhaigou, and almost none of our Chinese friends had heard of it. But there seemed to be enough around there that would occupy our time, and we were psyched for an adventure in the mountains.

On the mountain top in Songpan