Hello Uncle Foreigner

healthcare

Mar 23, 2018

Finding a cure for the common cold

Or, a much less traumatic experience with Chinese healthcare

In the past year, I’ve been getting pretty comfortable with the clinic two blocks from my house. The doctor there has a better hit rate than the pharmacy, and she works really hard. She’s there all day, so she has to do a bit of living out in public; When I went in for a follow-up visit recently, she was doing an afternoon mud mask.

Anyway, check out the video above to see what a basic visit to the Chinese clinic is like.

Nov 21, 2017

“Well, that happened, and that was weird”

Ten weeks in a Chinese hospital

Peter in his wheelchair in the park
The wild man lookFresh as a daisy after a haircut
Left: Peter tools around the park in his new wheelchair.
Right: In the hospital (top) Peter preferred the wild man look. He told me that trimming a beard was a man’s prerogative — when I offered to do it for him. These days, he’s going for a more civilized style (bottom) after a trim at the salon.

Early-August, we had big plans. A website relaunch, video premieres, a podcast, a vacation. And then … Peter’s back started hurting, more than usual. And then, he couldn’t walk. And then, he lost his mind.

Don’t worry, he’s on the mend now. And the hallucinations were only temporary. Years of hard living and not eating enough will take a toll on a body and the brain. Which is how we found out that the doctors at the Luzhou Medical College hospital are fantastic. And ten weeks in LMC hospital is … a lot.

Here’s what you might find in your Chinese hospital room: It’s always loud, and visiting hours are always. You’ve got more roommates than it feels like should be in one room, but at least you weren’t given one of the hallway beds. One of your roommates moans so loudly in his sleep that the other of your roommates — the one with a prosthetic leg — will just up and leave in the middle of the night. The medical care is fine, but orderly service is not included in the price of your bed, so some relatives choose to schelp their own patient’s full bedpan to the bathroom. (Not me. I paid for the help.) Also, you need to provide your own tissues, soap, towels, a basin for washing, and food. There’s no heat or air conditioning because we live south of the Yangtze River. But they will provide blankets. And one pillow.

They sent him home on October 23, and these days we go to outpatient physical therapy three times a week. Peter can do most things for himself, except for walking. But he’s close. Tomorrow, he’s going to try the parallel bars to hold himself up while he gets those legs back in shape, and after that, he’ll get to shuffle down the PT ward’s hallway. It’ll be another month or two, according to Dr. Yu. And then we’ll be back to your irregularly scheduled Uncle Foreigner.

Oct 13, 2011

In Chengdu

Our short trip to Chengdu wasn’t quite what we were expecting.

We were housed in an industrial-looking hotel on the very outskirts of the city, and had to have some complex negotiations even to go outside for a walk. We were basically ordered to have room service for dinner via phone, a command which was enforced by our Chinese-only speaking minder. I know that the motive behind it was kind, “we need to help out these crazy kids who only speak English,” but I would have much rather fended for ourselves - this is pretty much true of the whole trip.

But anyway, after we ate to the satisfaction of our guy, we negotiated a release. The neighborhood was far from the hip, young Chengdu we were expecting, but we’re still in a stage where crossing the street is an adventure. So we did just that, and crossed the street to the East Chengdu Rail Station.

It was huge, and pristine. It was about 8 p.m., and there weren’t many trains leaving that night so it wasn’t that crowded, but there was still a guard making sure people didn’t lay down on the seats. We found a western restaurant that served Coronas and Johnnie Walker! The Walker isn’t quite rare, but it isn’t super common either, so we were excited to have some real Scotch. It took a while to be served after we ordered - but then we noticed that someone actually had to run out to somewhere else to get a bottle. We enjoyed a few drinks before our 10 p.m. sustenance curfew (we were having physicals the next morning, and they said no food or drink after 10) and then headed back to the room.

We took the long way, wandering through the apartment complex where our hotel was located. They had a large courtyard, and they were showing a movie in the middle of it. We stopped to watch for a bit, and ran into our waiter from the restaurant!

The next morning, we woke up early and were taken to the International Hospital for our physicals. This was in Chengdu proper, and we did get a good glimpse of the city. It looks cool! Now this physical we got is mandatory for: foreigners staying in China for one year or more, Chinese who are going abroad for more than three months, and Chinese who work aboard international vessels or handle food and water in a port that services international vessels. You can only get the physical done in certain accredited establishments. So, this place was processing a lot of people at once. But they’ve got a system down.

1. You come in and register. They give you the appropriate paperwork for what you’re having done and the bill. In China, you always pay up front for healthcare.

2. You enter the assembly line: First you stop at the window for the urine cups, fill it (in the restroom, thankfully) and drop it off at the appropriate tray. The technician sticks one of your barcodes on it (your paperwork includes a sheet of barcodes that will get stuck to your various fluids and measurements). The technician also marks off on your sheet that you’ve hit this station, which everyone else will do too.

3. Blood sample. There’s another window which you stick your arm through, kind of like at the bank, but you give them your arm (and some barcodes) instead of money. They take your blood while the people on line behind you wait, sometimes very closely behind you. (An aside: We had heard before coming that the Chinese don’t really do queues - instead of lining up, everyone just amasses near the goal. We actually haven’t found this to be true - at checkouts and things, people are pretty orderly. Mostly. Our conjecture is that this is a recent development, and some people still do things the old way. I left a little space in front of me on line at the grocery store once, and this woman just fit herself right into it. This doesn’t happen often, but you do have to be a little more aggressive not to lose your place.)

4. Next is a series of different rooms with doctors taking your height and weight, ECG, ultrasound of your organs and chest x-ray. There’s no chit-chat and everyone is very efficient.

5. Finally, you sign out at the front desk where they give you a receipt and a juicebox of milk (a milkbox?). It was all over in about 15 minutes. Having come from the states, where this same exact physical took Peter and I two hours (not even counting the trip to another location for our chest x-rays), it was a bizarre experience. For what it was, I’m glad it was brisk and businesslike, but if I needed a real consultation … well, I miss the “care” part of healthcare.

So then, we made a few stops to drop off some other paperwork relating to our residence permits - Chengdu is where all the government offices are for Sichuan Province. And then our guy took us to McDonalds for lunch. Chinese McDonalds is a little different from American McDonalds - they have a few different items to cater to the local palate. And the quality of chicken in my sandwich was the best-quality fast food chicken I’ve ever had; McDs is comparatively expensive here - for the cost of the large fries, Peter and I can make a whole meal for two of us - so I think the meat has to be better quality than they can get away with in the states. There are chickens running around the streets everywhere; if you’re going to serve it, it better be good. That’s my opinion after a sample of one sandwich, anyway. (Another aside: Most people are pretty skinny here, but I’m noticing a few chubby kids in some of my classes. No one’s obese, but a couple are out-and-out fat. This is just what I was thinking about in McDonalds.)

It wasn’t the greatest night away, but it did give us a taste for traveling. The bus ride isn’t terrible - about 4 hours, but the buses are really clean and comfortable. And we had legroom for miles. I seriously couldn’t even reach the footrest on our trip home. When we got home, right away we started looking up day- and weekend trips that we can take from here. We still want to do a little more work on the apartment this weekend, but we’re hoping to get right back on that bus to Chengdu quite soon.

Sep 27, 2011

Today’s vocabulary words

Small victories

过敏 Allergies

氯雷他定 Loratadine

Look up the characters in Google translate. I successfully said those things!